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Florida man gets bitten by nurse shark who won’t let go, acts like it’s no big deal

A beachcompanion in Florida was recently bitten by one nurse shark — and that fact didn’t seem to faze him completely, according to a video that’s gone viral.

The strange incident took place in Jensen Beachand the shark in question did not let go of the man’s arm, not even when it came out of the water.

MIX OF SHARK MEMORIES CAUGHT ON CAMERA

Footage of the disturbing incident shows the unidentified man cradling the tiny shark as crowds stand around him in disbelief. He is seen standing patiently as he waits for help and ignores onlookers’ recommendations, which range from flipping the shark over to disorient it to punching it in the nose.

When asked if the bite hurts, he says no, though he notes that every time he tries to pull the shark out, it bites harder.

Florida man gets bitten by nurse shark who won’t let go, acts like it’s no big deal

The sloop claims that it had not harassed or attempted to attract the shark when it visited the beach that day. “I just wanted to play volleyball today, okay?” (Brian Foley via ViralHog)

EXPERT: WHAT TO DO IF YOU ENCOUNTER A SHARK WHILE SWIMMING

Despite the awkward and potentially painful situation, the man seems to take it all in stride and even jokes around with some of the people around him.

“I just wanted to play volleyball today, okay?” he can be heard commenting throughout the nearly five-minute video. “I’m not going to be charged for this, are I?”

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At the end of the clip, Martin County Fire Rescue officials finally come to the man’s aid and ask the crowd to give them room to work.

Representatives for Martin County Fire Rescue did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment. But according to what can be heard in the video, the man didn’t do anything to anger the nurse shark: he says he was simply swimming in the ocean when the shark got hooked.

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Nurse sharks are “slow-moving bottom dwellers and are, for the most part, harmless to humans,” according to National Geographic. However, they can grow up to 14 feet long and have strong jaws filled with thousands of tiny serrated teeth.

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