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Supreme Court Lets State’s Rules Against Boycotting Israel Stand In Blow To The ACLU

The Supreme Court recently ruled in favor of a law in Arkansas that bars state contractors from boycotting Israel, in a blow to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). The ruling is the latest in a series of decisions from the Supreme Court that have upheld anti-boycott laws in various states.

The case, Arkansas Times v. Waldrip, began in 2017 when the state of Arkansas passed a law that prohibited state contractors from engaging in boycotts against Israel. The law was challenged by the ACLU and the Arkansas Times, which argued that the law violated the First Amendment right to free speech. The district court sided with the ACLU and struck down the law, but the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that decision, ruling in favor of the state.

The ACLU then appealed to the Supreme Court, arguing that the law violated the First Amendment by punishing people for their political views. The Supreme Court, however, rejected the ACLU’s argument and upheld the 8th Circuit’s ruling. In a 5-4 decision, the justices argued that the law did not discriminate against any particular viewpoint, as it was applied to all state contractors regardless of their political views.

The decision is the latest in a series of rulings from the Supreme Court that have upheld anti-boycott laws in various states. In 2018, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of a similar law in Kansas, and in 2019 it upheld an anti-boycott law in Arizona. In each case, the Court argued that the laws did not violate the First Amendment because they did not target any particular viewpoint.

The ACLU and other civil liberties groups have argued that these laws are unconstitutional because they punish people for their political views. They argue that boycotts are a form of political expression and should be protected under the First Amendment. However, the Supreme Court has repeatedly ruled that anti-boycott laws are constitutional because they do not target any particular viewpoint.

The Supreme Court’s decision in Arkansas Times v. Waldrip is a major setback for civil liberties groups who have been fighting against anti-boycott laws in various states. The decision makes it clear that the Court believes these laws are constitutional and will continue to uphold them. For now, it appears that the Supreme Court is unlikely to reverse its stance on anti-boycott laws anytime soon.

The decision is also a blow to the ACLU, which has been fighting to protect the First Amendment rights of those who wish to boycott Israel. The organization argued that the Arkansas law was unconstitutional because it punished people for their political views, but the Supreme Court disagreed. The ACLU has vowed to continue to fight against anti-boycott laws in various states, but it is unclear if they will be successful in their efforts.

The Supreme Court’s decision in Arkansas Times v. Waldrip is a major setback for civil liberties groups who have been fighting against anti-boycott laws in various states. The decision makes it clear that the Court believes these laws are constitutional, and will continue to uphold them. For now, it appears that the Supreme Court is unlikely to reverse its stance on anti-boycott laws anytime soon.

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