Black Lives Matter Curriculum Coming To An Elementary School Near You!

Black Lives Matter Curriculum Coming To An Elementary School Near You!

The Liberals have proven one thing over the decades….they know that the best way to infiltrate and systematically change a culture is by brainwashing elementary-aged children with their agendas.

And they’re rolling out the exact same game plan now with BLM.

It’s coming to YOUR kids’ elementary school, and much sooner than you think.

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Take a look:

Think that could only happen in far-left New York or California?

Wrong.

It’s coming to Ames, Iowa next week.

From the School’s Board’s own website, here’s what they say:

During the week of February 1-5, classrooms across the District will engage in the Black Lives Matter at School Week of Action, a 5-day guide to expand student understanding of the Black Lives Matter at School Principles.

Why is the Ames CSD participating in the Black Lives Matter at School national week of action?

The Black Lives Matter at School movement, which is not formally affiliated with the Black Lives Matter Global Network or any other organization in the Movement for Black Lives, is a push to improve schools for Black students, teachers, and families. The movement is a call to schools across the nation to say and show that Black lives matter within the school walls and in the policies and practices that impact the lives and futures of Black students. The Week of Action is a time set aside to affirm all Black identities by centering Black voices, empowering students, and teaching about Black experiences beyond slavery.

This week of action not only benefits Black students but can also be transformative for non-Black students, particularly white students. Due in large part to school and residential segregation, white students often get a narrow view of blackness from their lived experiences. Recall that our secondary equity audits stated that “there were patterns of racial segregation within academic tracks. Specifically, Black, Latinx, and Native American students were less likely to be in class with White and Asian students.” Furthermore, in our 2020 spring Panorama Culture and Climate Survey, only 14% of our 6-12 grade students responded favorably to the question “How often do students at your school have important conversations about race, even when they might be uncomfortable?” In addition, only 24% of 6-12 grade students responded favorably to the question, “When there are major news events related to race, how often do adults at your school talk about them with students?” The Black Lives Matter at School Week of Action provides us with an opportunity to improve in these areas.

For years, our data has shown that there is a need to focus on our Black students. For years, community groups have requested we improve the educational experiences of our Black students. For years, Ames CSD staff have been working on deepening their critical consciousness. Now is the time for us to take action.

Ames CSD has taken some steps to begin addressing the disparities we see in our school data: committing to equity in the District’s purpose and priorities, working with experts Drs. Spikes and Swalwell to train staff in critical consciousness, and providing additional support for staff to further their knowledge through building-level professional development and district level opportunities. The next step toward change is using the knowledge we’ve attained to change the way we teach and interact with our students. We want our Black students to know they matter to the Ames Community School District.

Each day of the BLM at School week of action, two to three of the Black Lives Matter at School’s thirteen guiding principles will be discussed with students through age-appropriate lessons and activities. The thirteen principles and their descriptions can be found below. Early childhood and elementary descriptions can be found in the resources.

And here is the published Agenda of what will be taught (indoctrinated?) to those kids:

The Black Lives Matter Movement is guided by the following principles.

  1. Restorative Justice – We are committed to collectively, lovingly, and courageously working vigorously for freedom and justice for Black people and, by extension, all people. As we forge our path, we intentionally build and nurture a beloved community that is bonded together through a beautiful struggle that is restorative, not depleting.​

  2. Empathy – We are committed to practicing empathy; we engage comrades with the intent to learn about and connect with their contexts.

  3. Loving Engagement – We are committed to embodying and practicing justice, liberation, and peace in our engagements with one another.

  4. Diversity – We are committed to acknowledging, respecting, and celebrating difference(s) and commonalities.

  5. Globalism – We see ourselves as part of the global Black family and we are aware of the different ways we are impacted or privileged as Black folk who exist in different parts of the world.​

  6. Queer Affirming – We are committed to fostering a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking or, rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual unless s/he or they disclose otherwise.

  7. Trans Affirming – We are committed to embracing and making space for trans siblings to participate and lead. We are committed to being self-reflexive and doing the work required to dismantle cis-gender privilege and uplift Black trans folk, especially Black trans women who continue to be disproportionately impacted by trans-antagonistic violence.

  8. Collective Value – We are guided by the fact all Black lives matter, regardless of actual or perceived sexual identity, gender identity, gender expression, economic status, ability, disability, religious beliefs or disbeliefs, immigration status, or location.

  9. Intergenerational – We are committed to fostering an intergenerational and communal network free from ageism. We believe that all people, regardless of age, show up with the capacity to lead and learn.

  10. Black Families – We are committed to making our spaces family-friendly and enable parents to fully participate with their children. We are committed to dismantling the patriarchal practice that requires mothers to work “double shifts” that require them to mother in private even as they participate in justice work.

  11. Black Villages – We are committed to disrupting the Western prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, and especially “our” children to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.

  12. Unapologetically Black – We are unapologetically Black in our positioning. In affirming that Black Lives Matter, we need not qualify our position. To love and desire freedom and justice for ourselves is a necessary prerequisite for wanting the same for others.​

  13. Black Women – ​We are committed to building a Black women affirming space free from sexism, misogyny, and male‐centeredness.

The Federalist had an excellent article on the topic as well:

Next week, the Ames, Iowa public school district is sponsoring a “Black Lives Matter week of action” that includes teaching transgenderism to children as young as four years old, Young America’s Foundation reports.

On the school district’s webpage about this “week of action” slated for Feb. 1-5, it reprints the “Black Lives Matter at School Guiding Principles,” which include the following:

“6. Queer Affirming – We are committed to fostering a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking or, rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual unless s/he or they disclose otherwise.”

“7. Trans Affirming – We are committed to embracing and making space for trans siblings to participate and lead. We are committed to being self-reflexive and doing the work required to dismantle cis-gender privilege…”

“11. Black Villages – We are committed to disrupting the Western prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and ‘villages’ that collectively care for one another, and especially ‘our’ children to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.”

Besides being anti-family and adamant about teaching sexual information to children as young as four, the curriculum is overtly racist. Here are just a few examples.

The school district’s recommended lessons for middle and high school students during this week include a “Justice for Trayvon Martin Tool Kit” that includes the following statement for class discussion:

“Discuss George Zimmerman and his Internalized Racism [sic] how even though he is Latino, why he is labeled as white. Ex. George Zimmerman is ethnically latino[sic]–however, [sic] he has the same racial privilege as white person, living in a gated community. He has a light skin color, and he holds [sic] no spanish [sic] name. So Zimmerman is so white-washed, and consumed by white supremacy that [sic] is why he is white.”

A Latino man is judged by the color of his skin and then dehumanized in racial terms because of where he lives. This is okay to teach children in America using public tax dollars and public institutions.

The grammatically embarrassing “tool kit” also says: “THIS CAMPAIGN DIRECTLY TARGETS A PRISON-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX THAT SUPPORTS DRACONIAN DRUG POLICIES, IMMIGRANT DETENTION, AND THE SCHOOL TO PRISON PIPELINE.” It also encourages students to “organize in their schools and communities” with activities such as “hosting a school assembly about police violence, starting a student organization dedicated to discussing and working on issues around police violence and racial profiling…”

A coloring page for young children linked in the school district’s curriculum folder for this week includes the following super-awkward, stereotyped image:

We want children to be encouraged to think of black people as drummers wearing ragged jungle clothes and bare feet? It’s probably way too uncomfortable for me to make any commentary about the physical features of this cartoon man, but suffice it to say that in other contexts they would also be seen as evidence of racist stereotyping. If The New York Times published this picture as an editorial cartoon or article illustration, street agitators would lose their minds.

This same district plan for “early childhood” instruction links to a lesson from the blog “Raising Race-Conscious Children.” That site states: “A key premise of this blog is that naming race (and other social realities) can support people to be race conscious (as opposed to ‘color blind’).” Ladies and gentlemen, we are no longer in Martin Luther King Jr.’s vicinity with race issues. We are in a much, much darker place.

Oh and by the way, it wasn’t even a split decision.

According to TheIowaStandard, the Ames School Board voted unanimously to being indoctrinating the children with the platform:

Every member of the Ames Community Schoolboard expressed support for the Black Lives Matter Week of Action on Monday night. The district held a regularly scheduled board meeting that lasted well into the 11 o’clock hour.

Monic Behnken asked Anthony Jones, the director of equity of the district, what the days would look like during the Black Lives Matter Week of Action.

He told her it depends on the building. Some buildings and classrooms will incorporate it into everything they do each day during the week while others will limit it.

Jamet Colton said she “fully supports” the effort. She called it “necessary, crucial work.”

“I like how expansive the curriculum is,” she said. “I just want to say that trans-affirming and queer-affirming work is life-saving work.”

Gina Perez noted that she really appreciates the work Jones has done.

“Your presentation was just wonderful,” she said. “I would say it was moving. I do think this is vital for our school district to go through this and I’d love to see it every year. It would be wonderful.”

Sabrina Shields-Cook sand it is important the students have a sense of belonging. Citing suicide rates among transgender people and black students, she said the work is important and necessary.

Michelle Lenkaitis said she’s “very proud and happy” the district is undertaking the Black Lives Matter Week of Action.

“Any time you’re introducing things that make people uncomfortable in order to move us forward, I think it’s great,” she said. “Clearly based on comments on Facebook and letters we’ve gotten, people are uncomfortable. That’s not a bad thing.”

Alisa Frandsen said she really appreciates the “affirming work” in letting all the kids know they are valued and cared for in the district. She said it is important everyone read the 13 guiding principles – both documents that include the principles for the older kids and the younger students.

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So what do you think?

You ok with your kids being taught these things?

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